Jon Williams Pottery

Tag Archive for Coningsby

Bone tech!

pottery bone & movement sensor glued in place as a ceramic art installationThe minute motion sensors are glued into the belly of the ceramic bones – as you do!

Electronics supplied by Ashley Brown.

Apple Pye!

Ceramic, bronze and digital tech collaboration by Herefordshire artist Jon Williams from Eastnor HerefordshireCreative photo session with a sackful of oversized ceramic apples, a bucket of pottery bones and genius photographer Kirsty Pye,

The amazing images will shape the promotional flyer to accompany the interactive installations in all three Hereford Museums, designed to signpost visitors to each venue.

 

Reeves design

Think I’ve just found my designer for the project flyer!

 

Fire in the belly

Xylophone cooking pots destined for Coningsby Museum in Hereford by ceramic artist Jon WilliamsBrilliant day today with Ash introducing tech and LED lights into the cooking pots.

Here’s a wee video clip of the xylophone in action.

Smoking fire pots

Xylophone sound pots by artist potter Jon WilliamsThe last time I smoked fired some pottery, it was with a load of excited 4 yr olds from Evesham Nursery School at their amazing Forest School site in Worcestershire.

It was great to re-visit the technique here at the Pottery and marvel at the way the smoke draws and designs across the brick clay surface.

These terracotta beauties will form part of the xylophone extravaganza destined for Coningsby Medieval Museum in Hereford.

Animal magic

Cow shapped slabs of clay made by potter Jon WilliamsHad a relaxing and rewarding day making animal sprigs to be applied to the surface of some large brick clay pots.

The decoration is intended to illustrate food stuff from the Medieval era and the pots will eventually end up in the St John Medieval Museum installation.

Them bones them bones!

Xylophone made from pottery bones and clay potsExperiments with pottery bones and ceramic sound pots.

St John Medieval Museum has an enigmatic skeleton under the floor boards that visitors can view when a section of the floor is lifted.

Oranges and Lemons

I’ve been sketching bell shapes (upside down cooking pots!) – seem to be a good fit for the Coningsby Medieval museum. I found this little paragraph online:

As both antiquarian and more recent studies have noted, bells played a central role in medieval Christianity. The history and meanings of church bells are more complex than often assumed. Drawing on a mixture of archaeological and textual material, the article demonstrates that a variety of types of bell—and indeed other signaling devices—were found in early medieval Christianity, and argues that the social and spiritual meanings of bells, whilst in some aspects determined by liturgical texts of the eleventh century, could also vary markedly depending upon the context, use, and reception of their sound. A bell calling a community to prayer was thus not simply “marking” the hours; it was summoning and producing the spiritual community, and its voice could be contested and even on occasion rejected!

Oranges and lemons,
Say the bells of St. Clement’s.

You owe me five farthings,
Say the bells of St. Martin’s.

When will you pay me?
Say the bells of Old Bailey.

When I grow rich,
Say the bells of Shoreditch.

When will that be?
Say the bells of Stepney.

I do not know,
Says the great bell of Bow

Here comes a candle to light you to bed,
And here comes a chopper to chop off your head!

Coningsby Museum

Interactive art installation to reside in the fire place at Coningsby Museum HerefordHad a brilliant meeting with John at Coningsby Museum (the place with a skeleton under the floor) to decide exactly where the art work would be installed. He’s only gone and offered me the giant fireplace in the main room of the Museum!!

I’m awash with creative solutions to best fill the space, just a case of distilling some of them into prototypes.