Jon Williams Pottery

Tag Archive for musical pots

Cider – done!

Ceramic & Sound exhibition by artist potter Jon Williams at The Cider Museum HerefordGreat to finally see the ceramic apples displayed aloft on their magnificent kilderkin barrels. They sound wonderful too!

Pot sale!!!

The great  ‘Sensational Clay’ sell off – 12th August 2015 – Bilston Craft Gallery Garden Festival

touchy feely ceramics by Herefordshire artist potter Jon WilliamsThrown pots made from brick clay designed for gallery visitors to playInteractice pottery as part of Sensational Clay exhibition by Jon Williams

 

 

 

 

 

I’m looking to sell all the exhibits from my solo, touring exhibition ‘Sensational Clay’ at a one off event – The Garden Festival at Bilston Craft Gallery in the West Midlands.

I’ll be offering all the pieces at a fraction of their original value, in fact everything will be priced between a bargain £5 and £30 – everything must go!

For those who didn’t have the opportunity to visit the exhibition in one of five venues across the West Midlands and beyond, missed out on an extravaganza of fired ceramic designed to stimulate the five senses. All the exhibits were made with visitor interaction in mind and as well as being accessible to touch, there were aromatic pieces, musical rattle pots and sculptural curios inspired by food and drink.

Sensational Clay was first exhibited at Bilston Craft Gallery in the Summer of 2011. The show proved so popular with  it’s intended family audience, the Gallery suggested it be offered to other venues as a touring resource. It went on to be exhibited at New Brewery Arts in Cirencester, Tulie House Museum & Art gallery in Carslile, Worcester City Museum & Art Gallery before it’s last outing at Leamington Spa Art Gallery in Warwickshire.

The Garden Festival starts at 2pm and is due to finish at 5pm but do hurry as the work won’t be around for long!

Waterworks – done!

Young musicians at Hereford's Waterworks Museum get hands on with Ceramic & Sound installation by Jon WilliamsEven as I was unboxing the collection of Musical Water jugs, young musicians and pottery lovers were on the scene, eager to trial the installation. The pots will be proper put through their paces on Sunday 26th July as the new interactive Water Park at The Waterworks Museum in Hereford gets it’s official opening by the Mayor of Hereford.

Children enjoy ceramics & sound installation by artist Jon Williams from Eastnor Pottery

Terracotta plinths

Terracotta bases for oversized ceramic musical applesAlthough the tech ‘fits’ under the apple – it does feel decidedly snug and, as I’ve recently discovered, makes assembly of the whole a bit of a faff.

So, I’ve decided to sit the apples on their very own terracotta plinths. Here’s one with the addition of sound holes for added amplification.

Apple Pye!

Ceramic, bronze and digital tech collaboration by Herefordshire artist Jon Williams from Eastnor HerefordshireCreative photo session with a sackful of oversized ceramic apples, a bucket of pottery bones and genius photographer Kirsty Pye,

The amazing images will shape the promotional flyer to accompany the interactive installations in all three Hereford Museums, designed to signpost visitors to each venue.

 

Noels Wonderful Water Park

Anique work bench awaiting crusty rural sound jugs by artist potter Jon WilliamsI met with Noel, the Waterworks Museum’s Director on Monday and as is customary, we finished our meeting with a a stroll around the Waterpark to view progress.

It’s been a long time in the making but the Park full of pumps and pistons is nearing completion.

All the interactive activity stations have been built by the industrious team of volunteers and the final interpretation is being prepared at the printers.

The site officially opens on the 26th July 2015 and hopefully the Potter’s Bench (above) will be primed with Musical jugs and ready for action. Watch this space!

Fire in the belly

Xylophone cooking pots destined for Coningsby Museum in Hereford by ceramic artist Jon WilliamsBrilliant day today with Ash introducing tech and LED lights into the cooking pots.

Here’s a wee video clip of the xylophone in action.

Smoking fire pots

Xylophone sound pots by artist potter Jon WilliamsThe last time I smoked fired some pottery, it was with a load of excited 4 yr olds from Evesham Nursery School at their amazing Forest School site in Worcestershire.

It was great to re-visit the technique here at the Pottery and marvel at the way the smoke draws and designs across the brick clay surface.

These terracotta beauties will form part of the xylophone extravaganza destined for Coningsby Medieval Museum in Hereford.

Jack & Jill

jack & Jill nursery rhyme inspiration for ceramic art work in HerefordI have been contemplating short, relevant and instantly recognisable tunes to encourage Museum visitors to interact with the work. Mainly for the interpretation – “See if you can play…..” that kind of thing.

We have 10 green bottles for the Cider Museum, Oranges & Lemons for Coningsby Medeival Museum and I proposed ‘Row row row your boat’ for the waterworks. When I mooted the idea with Museum director Noel and he came back with a much more suitable suggestion – this is what he had to say:

“The nursery rhyme tune we associate with the Museum is Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch a pale of water; Jack fell down and broke his crown and Jill came tumbling after.

This rhyme is most especially apt in these circumstances as the rhyme is thought to be an account of King Charles I’s attempt to reform the tax on liquid measures. When Parliament rejected his suggestion, he instead made sure that the volume was reduced on half- and quarter-pints, known as jacks and gills, respectively. This fits perfectly with your pots!”

Couldn’t agree more Noel!

Oranges and Lemons

I’ve been sketching bell shapes (upside down cooking pots!) – seem to be a good fit for the Coningsby Medieval museum. I found this little paragraph online:

As both antiquarian and more recent studies have noted, bells played a central role in medieval Christianity. The history and meanings of church bells are more complex than often assumed. Drawing on a mixture of archaeological and textual material, the article demonstrates that a variety of types of bell—and indeed other signaling devices—were found in early medieval Christianity, and argues that the social and spiritual meanings of bells, whilst in some aspects determined by liturgical texts of the eleventh century, could also vary markedly depending upon the context, use, and reception of their sound. A bell calling a community to prayer was thus not simply “marking” the hours; it was summoning and producing the spiritual community, and its voice could be contested and even on occasion rejected!

Oranges and lemons,
Say the bells of St. Clement’s.

You owe me five farthings,
Say the bells of St. Martin’s.

When will you pay me?
Say the bells of Old Bailey.

When I grow rich,
Say the bells of Shoreditch.

When will that be?
Say the bells of Stepney.

I do not know,
Says the great bell of Bow

Here comes a candle to light you to bed,
And here comes a chopper to chop off your head!