Categories
artist garden sculpture Outside surface quality

Ancient oak slab

a weathered and textured oak slab at eastnor pottery herefordshire

This gnarly ‘ol slab of oak has been gently decaying in the Pottery garden for the last 10 years or so.

It was initially used to display several of my discovery pots – lidded, thrown cylinders containing fresh clay and a note encouraging the ‘discoverer’ to make something and leave it in the pot. Little creativity traps! A few days later, I collected the models, took them back to the Pottery, fired them and exhibited the results online.

The elements and time have worked their magic on the wood and I adore the range of texture and colour of the decomposing timber.

a weathered and textured oak slab at eastnor pottery herefordshirea weathered and textured oak slab at eastnor pottery herefordshirea weathered and textured oak slab at eastnor pottery herefordshirea weathered and textured oak slab at eastnor pottery herefordshire

 

 

Categories
experiments surface quality

Thorny Charcoal

thorny charcoal sticks created by burning pruned rose bushes by herefordshire artist jon williams

These thorny sticks of charcoal are an inspiring bi-product of recent smoke firing and sagger experiments.

They originated as garden waste, pruned from my father in law’s rose bush and contributed to the marks and effects on this little pot.

I’m marveling at the texture and shape of the charred, blackened twigs and excited by the possibilities of using them in my work.

Categories
experiments work in progress

Sagging saggers

broken saggers used in the fire place by potter jon williams to decorate his pots with smoke

I think its time to retire these ol’ saggers! #kintsugi anyone?

Also… not sure what the shiny black stuff is on the inside the one on the left – tar or creosote maybe? Whatever it is I like it!! 🖤🖤🖤

Categories
artist experiments work in progress

Out of the ashes

Somewhere in this blackened sagger is a little burnt offering in need of  wire wool & wax tlc!

thrown torn and altered pot made on the potter's wheel by ceramic artist jon williamssmoke fired thrown torn and altered pot made on the potter's wheel by ceramic artist jon williamsthrown torn and altered pot made on the potter's wheel by ceramic artist jon williams

Categories
experiments work in progress

Slab building

Although I’m a thrower, I do enjoy the challenge of working with other pottery techniques.

These slabbed constructions are ceramic bases, designed to support a sculpture on a metal rod. That said, I reckon they look pretty cool as stand alone pieces. I particularly enjoy the potential for geometric pattern making when the bases are lined up in groups.

slabbed base made by herefordshire ceramic artist jon williams

Categories
Exhibitions experiments Interactive art

Smoke fired bee

I recently made a selection of high fired bee and bug shakers for a gallery in London. The high temperature makes for a satisfying ‘ring’ when the rattle is shaken.

As I was lowering the last beastie into the kiln, I decided on a whim to save it from the firing and give it a lower temperature bisque instead. My intention, to incorporate it into my smoke firing experiments as up until that point all the test pieces had been vessels.

So glad I did!

I’m really pleased with the colours. Deep blacks, a hint of terracotta and the odd flash of white – perfect!…and although the rattle sounds slightly different its still an interesting sonic.

Unfortunately, this discovery came too late for the critters heading to London, but if I could have my time with them again….

Categories
experiments Outside work in progress

Saggers

Whilst experimenting with smoke fired pottery on the BBQ last Spring, I found a lot of my pots developed hair-line cracks and fissures due to the thermal shock of the flames licking the ware. There was only one course of action – make myself some saggers!

Those of you who might not be familiar with the word, a sagger is a protective fire-clay box enclosing ceramic ware while it is being fired.

Traditionally, they were used in the pottery industry to protect the pottery whilst it was fired in huge bottle kilns.

Above are some fine examples of antique saggers, piled high at Gladstone Pottery Museum in Stoke. They’ve obviously seen some action and been in and out of the kiln many many times, protecting their precious contents from the ferocity of the fire. The pitted and roasted surfaces really tell a story – I love the effect!

I used brick clay to make my saggers – x3 crude and rather brutal looking cylinders with lids made on the potter’s wheel and fired to 960 degrees. 

Not only do the saggers prevent cracking, but I have produced some really intense blacks by packing combustible materials around the work inside the sagger. The twigs and sawdust inside the sagger smolder in the oxygen deprived atmosphere rather than burst into flame. This produces a lot of smoke which permeates the ceramic surface with great effect. 

sagger made from brick clay on a fire protecting pottery by herefordshire artist jon williams

I’ve had so much fun experimenting with the saggers over the Autumn and Winter, firing them on the BBQ, bonfires and inside the house in the fireplace during the colder months.

sticks of charcoal inside a sagger created by herefordshire potter jon williams
Sticks of charcoal produced by the slow burning of hazel sticks inside the sagger

 

Categories
artist experiments Interactive art work in progress

Milk Chocolate Bees

I’ve been developing more rattles and shakers, this time in the shape of bugs and bees. Each little beastie is made entirely from sections created on the potter’s wheel. The separate elements are joined together and smoothed to give the appearance of being whole. (Each bee has been made from x4 separate wheel throw sections.)

The freshly assembled insects above have just been coated in a layer of thick, luscious white slip and I think you’ll agree, they look pretty tasty at this stage.

They do change quite a bit when they emerge from the kiln:

terracotta micro bug rattle designed to sit in the palm of one hand made by herefordshire artist jon williamsterracotta micro bee rattle made by herefordshire artist jon williams

To give you a sense of scale – each bee or bug can sit happily in the palm of one hand. Tiny little ceramics!

Categories
experiments Outside

Quite like it as it is!

Something I greatly value about the making process is the emergence of an unexpected outcome.

The potter’s wheel offers lots of potential for a creative ‘surprise’ and I always try to stay alert to the ‘happy accident’. The slightest change in hand position or shift in concentration can lead to a whole new aesthetic or approach. I may not have the time to action the diversion straight away but will photograph, make notes and bank the idea for another day.

sculptural ceramics by herefordshire potter jon williams

More recently, I’ve been getting further and further through the making process before the ‘light bulb’ moment presents itself. The forms above were thrown and assembled bodies of insects designed for a garden sculpture exhibition. There is something very elementary and abstract about the forms at that particular stage in the process that prompted me to take the photo. I then attached legs and wings to achieve the original intention and turned them into something quite different from the legless versions! 

This piece below is a slabbed base designed to display a ceramic fish sculpture. A metal rod inserted in the hole to suspend the fish at the other end.

slab built vessel by potter jon williams

Most of my work starts it’s life on the potter’s wheel so shapes are invariably soft and organic looking. Producing a straight sided, angular object required me to work with another technique. I had so much fun rolling the clay, drying, assembling the slabs and finally smoothing the joins, it got me inspired to do more. Discounting the original function of the piece, I think the leather hard result looks like it could hold it’s own as a stand alone sculptural vessel.